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Judge Rules That Gun Tattoos Can Be Used As Evidence In Aaron Hernandez’s Murder Trial

Prosecutors Will Use Ex-New England Patriot Star Aaron Hernandez’s Gun Tattoos As Evidence In Double Murder Trial Next Month.

 Jurors are going to be seeing a whole lot of Aaron Hernandez’s skin when he returns to the court room next month.

On Tuesday, a judge ruled that the former New England Patriot’s tattoos can be used as evidence against him in a new murder trial.

Hernandez, 27, is already serving a life sentence without the possibility of parole for the 2013 murder of Odin Lloyd.

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This next trial pertains to the 2012 double murder of 29-year-old Daniel de Abreu and 28-year-old Safiro Furtado, who Hernandez allegedly shot dead in a drive-by shooting after they accidentally bumped into him at a bar in Boston.

The two tattoos that prosecutors fought to have included as evidence both depict guns. He allegedly got them done at the same time, in the spring of 2013, at a tattoo shop in Hermosa, California.

The first tattoo shows a six-shot revolver with five bullets in the cylinder and an empty changer next to the words ‘God Forgives’. The text is spelled backwards so that it can only be read in the mirror.

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This is the tattoo that prosecutors believe is a reference to the double murder, since five bullets were fired in that slaying.

The second tattoo shows a semi-automatic pistol with one spent shell casing and a wisp of smoke emanating from the casing. It’s unclear where on the body his tattoos are located.

Prosecutors believe Hernandez got that tattoo to commemorate the time he shot a friend in the face in 2013.

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That former friend, Alexander Bradley, is set to testify against Hernandez during this upcoming case.

While Hernandez’s lawyers argued that the use of the tattoos as evidence of his guilt was ‘rank speculation’ – the judge ruled that they could be used because the jury could see them as ‘evidence reflecting consciousness of guilt’.

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